Twitter client for Mac #Twitter

The official Twitter client for the Mac died yesterday. When you try and start it now it fails to authenticate any of your accounts. This is because Twitter announced recently that they were going to stop developing and supporting their client on the Mac in an attempt to people to use their Web-based client instead.

For me and I suspect many others I really don’t like using the web client. It’s something simple to do with it suiting the way I think and work but having Twitter in its own client app away from the work I’m doing in Safari suits me.

So having looked at a few options I’ve bought TweetBot for the Mac and it seems fine and an easy transition.  What I don’t understand is the business logic behind Twitter’s decision to kill their Mac-based client.  For a company, the size of Twitter employing one or two developers to support a Mac client is hardly a significant investment. Most of the code base should be in common with their iOS version and the skillset is basically the same.  There’s also the expectation that at WWDC 2018, the annual Apple developer conference that they will announce support in iOS and MacOS for universal apps. This will allow developers to create a single app that can be downloaded and run on Mac and iPhone for example.  Why would Twitter kill the Mac client now rather than wait and create a good universal MacOS/iOS app?

In effect what Twitter has yielded control of thousands of influential Mac Users to third-party clients which they will struggle to control and gain advertising income from so easily.

When you see such irrational business decisions being made you have to wonder if there aren’t fundamentally more serious problems at Twitter.

Let me know what you think in a comment below.

 


Social Media Image Sizes Cheat Sheet and templates

Social Media Image Sizes Cheat Sheet Infographic

I spotted this really useful Social Media Image Sizes infographic earlier on twitter. It has all the image dimensions and file size restrictions for all the major social media platforms. I thought I’d post it to the blog, if only so I know where to find it when I need it, but I think you’ll find it useful.
Social Media Image Sizes

Facebook

Profile image: 180x180px but note that Facebook will also generate a 32 x 32 version as a thumbnail which will be used throughout Facebook.

Cover Photo: 851 x 315px – if you make it any smaller then it will be scaled to this size. For best results upload an RGB JPG file less than 100kb. Images with a logo or text may be best as a PNG file.

Uploaded / Shared Images: The recommended size is 1,200 x 630 px. These will appear in feed at a max width of 470 px and will scale to this size if you upload a smaller image.

Linked In

Profile Image: 400 x 400px – Recommend between 400×400 and 20,000 x 20,000px with a max file size of 10mb

YouTube

Channel Cover Photo: 2560×1440

There are a lot of different platforms and devices that users can stream YouTube on so it’s important that your brand has a photo optimised for each one.

Display Sizes:

Tab!et displays: 1855 x 423 –

TV display’. 2560 x 1440

Mobile display: 1546 x 423

Desktop: 2560 x 423

(1546 x 423 – pixels are always visible).

Twitter

Header Photo: 1500×500

Profile Photo: 400×400 but is displayed at 200×200

In-Stream Photo: 400×250

 

UPDATE 2018: MakeAWebsitehub.com have been in touch to say that they have published an updated Social Media Image and Video Sizes Guide for 2018.  Click here for the latest version.


Our blog now has a Twitter Account.

Screen Shot 2016-01-04 at 21.34.19I’ve been using Twitter client sites for years now but never got around to setting it up for my own IT blog.  This evening I have finally created a Twitter Account to go with this blog. If you follow ITMAN101 on Twitter I’ll let you know whenever we post a new blog or have any news to share.

Here’s our very first tweet…