Don’t Make Me Think: A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability – new edition published.

By Steve Krug published by New Riders

I bought this book when it first came out in 2000, since then, hundreds of thousands of Web designers and developers have relied on usability guru Steve Krug’s guide to help them understand the principles of intuitive navigation and information design.
On the back of the book the publisher says “Witty, commonsensical, and eminently practical, it’s one of the best-loved and most recommended books on the subject. Now Steve returns with fresh perspective to reexamine the principles that made Don’t Make Me Think a classic–with updated examples and a new chapter on mobile usability. And it’s still short, profusely illustrated…and best of all–fun to read. If you’ve read it before, you’ll rediscover what made Don’t Make Me Think so essential to Web designers and developers around the world. If you’ve never read it, you’ll see why so many people have said it should be required reading for anyone working on Web sites.
STEVE KRUG managed to labor happily in near-total obscurity as a highly respected usability consultant until the publication of the first edition of Don” t Make Me Think. Ten years later, he finally gathered enough energy to write another book: the usability testing handbook Rocket Surgery Made Easy: The Do-ItYourself Guide to Finding and Fixing Usability Problems. The books were based on the 2o+ years he’s spent as a usability consultant for a wide variety of clients like Apple, Bloomberg.com, I.exus.com, NPR, the International Monetary Fund, and many others. His consulting firm, Advanced  Common Sense, is based in Chestnut Hill, MA. Steve currently spends most of his time teaching usability workshops, consulting, and watching black-and-white movies from the ‘3os and ‘4os.  “
I haven’t had a chance to look at the new edition yet but on the basis that the original became a classic I would highly recommend this for any web developers, mobile app developers or others involved in User Experience design (UX).

Click here to view this on Amazon.co.uk
Price: £18.19


How to insert a table / row into a WordPress page.

Wordpress missing insert table row editor function

 

These days we try to avoid using HTML tables for layout purposes but there are times when a table is absolutely the right answer, for example when laying out a set of data points, pricing information or other structured data.  Yesterday I was helping my son with a blog post using WordPress and told him to insert a table only to find that by default these days the WordPress editor doesn’t actually have an Insert > Table or Insert > Table > Row function. We were in a hurry at the time and we needed to get the job done so I just popped into the HTML view and entered the code. I’m happy to do this as I’ve been writing HTML and the like since the dawn of time… but it’s not acceptable or a great experience for people starting out or those who just don’t want to get into that detail.

Wordpress editor without insert table

This picture shows the default WordPress editor without an Insert Table button

Today I’ve had a bit more time to research this and I’ve found that the WordPress Insert Table and WordPress Insert Table Row editor functions can easily be added back via a very popular plugin.

Wordpress Table Editor Plugin

This graphic shows how to locate the WordPress Table Editor plugin.

 

To add the WordPress Table editor function, click on Plugin’s on the left hand navigation menu. Then in the keyword search box in the top right enter “MCE Table Buttons”.  You should then see a plugin called “MCE Table Buttons” (shown here top right). As you can see it’s very popular with over 100,000 active installations.  Just click the Install Now button and then activate the plugin.

Wordpress Editor with Insert Table function enabled.

This graphic shows the WordPress editor after we have enabled the Table Editor functions that allow you to add tables, columns and rows to your HTML tables in WordPress.

Once you have installed the MCE Table Buttons plugin you will then find the missing Table Editor button in the WordPress Editor.

If you have any questions about HTML tables or using the Table Function in the WordPress Editor just leave a question in a comment below and I’ll try and get straight back to you.


Teach yourself to code (or teach your kids to code).

From time to time I share interesting infographics that I spot on social media. I spotted this one earlier and though it was quite good. I’d certainly endorse the idea of learning Python, Javascript, Ruby and Java. I’d also recommend trying Scratch if you are brand new to development. It’s aimed at kids in primary school but I’ve used in to train staff in the basics of algorithms and software development in the workplace.  You might also want to look at Swift on the Apple devices and .Net C# on Windows, both have free development environments to get you started.

teach yourself coding info-graphic

 

If you are interested in how to get started in software development or have any suggestions do get in touch or leave a comment below. I’ll write some follow-up blogs if there is any demand for articles on this subject.